Posted in Neural Spasm, Sermons, Tell Me!

10 Questions of Christmas: the tenth day

I mean, either we’re all God children, as we’re taught in Sunday school, ad nauseum, or we’re not. If we are, then how can Jesus be God’s only son? And if Jesus is not God’s only son, but rather God has billions on sons and daughters — rather like some cosmic insect — then how is the temporary death of one (especially when so many others die each day) in any way meaningful?

And that brings us to the big question.

– – – – – – – – Question #10 – – – – – – – – – – –

Remind me, what was the point of Jesus’ visit again?

Isn’t Jesus just God in the flesh? Since Christianity is a monotheism, then God, Jesus and the Holy Ghost are all different aspects of the same being.That is, they are all God.

So Jesus (God) came down to be sacrificed (to God) so that we could be saved (from God)… WHAT?

Those of you ‘of the faith’ will be wondering why I’m confused here, so let me spell it out.

1. Why did God need a sacrifice to allow Himself to forgive us for the original sin, which was only committed, by God’s full knowledge (as we’ve already discussed) by two very naive humans? And any punishment metted out regarding said sin, came from God. After all, isn’t He all powerful, all knowing, all good? So why did He require this sacrifice to forgive?

2. Just what sacrifice was there anyway? I mean, Jesus knew he was going to die, and He went willingly. That could be a sacrifice, sure. Except, oh yeah, He also knew He was going to be resurected in three days. So no sacrifice actually happened since Jesus remained alive after the dust (and tombstone) settled.

3. Just wtf happened in this whole Jesus story anyway? Can any sane person believe this makes even the smallest shred of sense? I’m borrowing from Peter Boghossian here, who described it thusly in A Manual for Creating Atheists:

God sacrificed Himself to Himself to save us from Him.

Work it out, and that’s what the entire story of original sin through to the Passion of Christ comes down to. And it makes absolutely no sense whatsoever. Unless God is completely insane. And being at the whim of an insane being powerful enough to manipulate the fabric of the universe is not what I consider to be a comforting thought (although it does sound like the plot of a decent comic book).

Anyway, regardless of the original, scared, meaning behind Christmas, I do believe it’s good to have such an event. It provides a much needed pause at the end of the year to sit back, enjoy some nice moments with friends and family, and take stock for the new year. I generally use it as a *relatively* quiet time to reflect and plan anew. Or I did before having children! Still, it’s important not to take the trappings (gifts, decorations) too strongly, and just enjoy the break. Relax. Say ‘hi’ to friends and family you’ve been out of contact with for a while. Renew and refresh aquaintances. And enjoy life, even if just for a day or two before the rat race begins again.

Merry Christmas everyone.

Insight and longevity.

The Revenant

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I'm a writer, publisher, digital artist and web designer. As chief editor of Utility Fog Press I've been responsible for the publication of three anthologies.

2 thoughts on “10 Questions of Christmas: the tenth day

  1. Jesus is the only begotten son of God, That is born of God by the action of the Holy Spirit sent from God the Father to make Mary pregnant so that her first born son named Joshua [ in Hebrew ] or Jesus [ in Greek] could be born. He is the one recognized today worldwide by Christians as Jesus Christos [ generally shortened in English to Christ] meaning Saviour King, the Servant King referred to in Isaiah Chapter 53. Jesus Christ by accepting death of the worst form Rome could muster up, Crucifixion, served the whole of humanity by expressing the message of love that he had brought and taught, by sacrificing his own body to pay the penalty of sin for us. Because of his sacrifice, God accepts as His sons and daughters into His Kingdom, all who trust in Jesus for salvation, determined with God’s help to live here as His children and obey Him rather than simply do what we want. Not all humans are children of God. Only those who trust God and try to obey God relying upon the Holy Spirit to help them and adhering to the teaching of Jesus Christ which basically is “Love the Lord your God with all your heart [emotions], mind and strength, and love your neighbour as much as you love yourself”, and by neighbour He means all other humans.

    1. Thank you for your comments, even if they continue to perpetrate the unthinking craziness of modern Christianity. Simply put, IF Christianity is a monotheism (which it supposes to be) then, by definition, there is only one god — who is, rather uncreatively, called God. Thus all aspects of the holy trinity (Jesus and the Holy spirit) are just different aspects of God. From this follows that God sacrificed his physical form of Jesus to Himself. Why? To save us from our sins. But who is it that punishes us for our sins? God. So God’s sacrifice of Himself to Himself is to appease Himself, so that He won’t hurt us…?!?!?! It’s completely ludicrous.

      But, being ludicrous doesn’t mean it’s not true. However, if it is true then I, for one, want to get off this universe before the madman in charge does something really crazy. When a person trusts a being like God, who has continually demonstrated almost no regard for human life or human happiness, it suggests to me that either such a person has already given up all control over their lives and just accepts whatever such a dictator desires, for better or worse, or that said person hasn’t really thought about what they’re doing. So, let’s just say that I’m of the camp that believes (and hopes) that God doesn’t exist. But if He does, I’d be right there on the front lines of the rebellion, fighting Him every step of the way. Because, it’s easy to talk about loving thy neighbour, but God has given us very little evidence to suggest that He loves us.

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